Doxological Theology

“Shout for joy to God, all the earth;
sing the glory of his name; give to him glorious praise!
(Psalm 66:1–2)

I have heard it said, and I completely agree, that all theology should lead to doxology.  That is, every conversation about God, who He is, what He has done, should ultimately inspire us to praise.  The more we know about God, the more we will want to fall on our knees and praise Him.  Allow me to illustrate…

Last Sunday I began our Adult Sunday School Class on the book of Jude.  As Jude opens his letter, he addresses the epistle to “those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept in Jesus Christ” (Jude 2).  As we unpacked this threefold phrase (called, beloved, kept), I asked the class to turn to Romans 8:29-30 – what is commonly referred to as the Golden Chain of Salvation.

In these two verses we find one of the most succinct explanations of God’s work of Salvation in all of Scripture.  These two verses have inspired volumes and tomes to try to describe God’s great work of grace and mercy in our salvation.  There will be no attempt to speak exhaustively on it here: but note what the apostle teaches:

For those whom he foreknew… This word draws upon the OT word “know” to emphasize that God had a personal, covenantal affection for His people.  God wasn’t randomly picking names out of a hat, but those whom He knew from the beginning of time…

He also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son…  God has crafted our destiny, and our destiny is to be conformed to the image of His Son, to be like Christ.  Many reject the notion of predestination as God for-ordaining our every move.  I don’t think that’s what Paul is saying.  That’s not what predestination means.  I don’t think that God orchestrates our every move, as though we are marionettes on a string.  I do, however, affirm that God’s sovereign will and His plan for all creation will be fully realized, and in the end we will see how, for those who love God, all things have worked together for good, that is, the good and glorious goal of our being conformed to the image of Christ.

And those whom he predestined he also called…  God calls His children, by the testimony of the Word (preached, read, etc.) and by the inward working of the Holy Spirit.  When we are lost in sin, dead to the things of God, alienated from His kingdom, God calls us out of darkness and into the light.  God calls us out of death and into life.  God calls us out of sin and into righteousness.  God calls us out of the dominion of sin and into the kingdom of Christ.  This call comes through the outward preaching and teaching of the Word, the proclamation of the Gospel, and is received by the inward working of the Holy Spirit.  The reason you responded to the call is not because you are wiser than the others, but because the Spirit changed your heart.

Those whom we called he also justified…  The Westminster Confession says it best: God justified, “not by infusing righteousness…, but by pardoning their sins, and by accounting and accepting their persons as righteous; not for anything wrought in them, or done by them, but for Christ’s sake alone; not by imputing faith itself, the act of believing, or any other evangelical obedience to them, as their righteousness, but by imputing the obedience and satisfaction of Christ unto them, they receiving and resting on him and his righteousness by faith; which faith they have not of themselves, it is the gift of God.”

Those whom he justified he also glorified…  Those who have been known by God, predestined by God, called by God, and justified by God, will ultimately also be glorified by God as well.  Paul speaks of this assurance of God’s work with such confidence that he puts it in the past tense.  God will complete what He has started, and as Paul finishes the 8th chapter of Romans, we are assured that nothing will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Okay, I said this would not be an exhaustive study on Romans 8:29-30, so let me get back to my original point.  As I said at the beginning, all theology should lead to doxology, to praise, and this Golden Chain of Salvation clearly demonstrates how that happens.

Notice as you read through Romans 8:29-30, there is not one mention of our work, of our choice, of our responsibility.  Our salvation is the one work of God.  Yes, there is the gracious response to all that God is done.  When the Spirit makes us alive to God, we answer the call, embrace the grace, and grow in righteous obedience to the Word of God.  But all of this is a response to the primary, foundational, sine qua non gracious work of God.

Because our salvation is the work of God, it is therefore sure and secure.  I don’t have to worry that I might let God down (that’s actually a given), that I might rebel and fall away from my salvation.  I am kept in Christ, it is His sovereign grace, His calling, His justifying – it is His work.  He will not let me go.

As I was teaching this to the Sunday School class, one class member stopped me and said, “Can I just say, ‘Hallelujah!’”  Absolutely; that’s the point of it all.  All our theological musings, all our confessional statements, every word upon the Word should lead us, ultimately, to give glory to God.

All theology should produce a humble and gracious response of love.  If you study this Golden Chain, or the 5 Points of Calvinism, or any other theology for that matter, and come away with an air of superiority and self-righteousness, you have completely missed the point.  If your theology leads you to sit in judgment of others who are lost in sin rather than compelling you to demonstrate for all to see the very grace, mercy, and love of God that delivered you from sin and death, then your theology is of no use to you, to the world, and does not bring God glory. The theology of the church does not exist to puff up the pride of man, but to exalt and glorify God.

We are His creation.  Salvation is His gift.  It is all His work.  All glory and honor belong to Him.

Sola Deo Gloria!

I Am Loved!

Anyone out there remember these pins?

I know I wore one (on the lapel of my blue denim jacket – oh the early 80’s).  I have to confess, it was a self-confidence thing for me.  I never felt right unless I knew I was loved by someone.  In high school and college, I had to have a girlfriend, I just wasn’t complete without knowing someone loved me.  Yeah, I knew my parents loved me, but that wasn’t enough.  I wanted someone who wanted me, who made me a priority in their life, someone who chose me out of all the rest. 

Whether the need is expressed, we all want to be special, we all want to be chosen, we all want to be loved (is that so wrong?).  We will go to great lengths to find this love, too.  In Junior High and High School, no one dares stand out of the crowd.  You do your best to fit in, to look like the rest, to perform your best, so that you will be accepted, not rejected by your peers.  Even as adults, we so desperately want to be accepted we’ll compromise our values or spend obscene amounts of money on things we don’t need but will make people think more highly of us.  Meanwhile we do our very best to hide our flaws so that no one will see our true selves and leave us rejected and unacceptable.

Still, there is one who sees us as we really are, and loves us anyway.  Quite frankly, in God’s sight, we are unacceptable people.  Our sins are exposed before him, we cannot cover them up.  Even our best efforts to try to make ourselves presentable before God are flawed and stained with sin.  As Isaiah puts it, “We have all become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous deeds are like a polluted garment.”

And yet, God loves us still.  In fact, He loves us so much that He gave us His Son, so that whoever will believe in Him will not die but have everlasting life (John 3:16).  In Christ, whose righteousness covers our sinfulness, whose holiness atones for our trespass, whose pardon forgives our transgression, in Christ the unacceptable find acceptance in God.  When Jesus cried out “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” it was so that we could cry “My God, my God, why hast thou accepted me?”


Mystery of Mercy – Caedman’s Call

Herein lies the gospel: that I, unloveable and unacceptable, am loved by God.  The desperate longing to be accepted, chosen, and loved is found in Christ.  As Les and Leslie Parrot put it, “My compulsion for completion can only be met in Jesus Christ.”  I know I am loved, and nothing can separate me from the love of God in Christ Jesus my Lord.

I used to wear that pin as a relationship status symbol – kind of like what we see on Facebook today.  Now, if I can find one, I think I’ll wear the pin to help proclaim the gospel.

Isn’t it great to know that you are loved?

SDG