In the School of Prayer

Now Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” (Luke 11:1)

There is a scene from Shakespeare’s Hamlet in which Hamlet plans to kill his uncle Claudius, but cannot because Claudius is praying, and Hamlet would not want Claudius’ soul to be cleansed and rise to heaven. Setting aside the unbiblical and misguided understanding of salvation, what has always resonated with me in this scene in Claudius’ comment after he rises from prayer. In great irony, Claudius has found no comfort in prayer, saying, “My words fly up, my thoughts remain below” (III.iii.96). His prayers have been insincere, ineffective, and his soul remains unchanged in prayer.

Often have I shared this feeling when rising from prayer.  I draw near to the Lord, but feel my words have merely bounced around the room; never penetrating the roof, much less the throne room of grace. How can I be prepared for an eternity before God in His new Heaven and new Earth, when I grow weary after 15 minutes in prayer?

Spiritual disciplines require a similar approach in training as physical disciplines.  If you want to run a marathon, you start by running 1 mile. If you want to grow in prayer, then you must start praying.  Pray, seeking God’s Holy Spirit to give you the words to pray, to give you a spirit of prayer, to increase your passion for praying.  The old puritans taught, “pray until you pray.”

So I’ve decided this year to enroll myself in the school of prayer.  To sit under the teaching of God’s Word, reading and studying the prayers of scripture to increase my heart for prayer.  I’ve picked up a couple of books on prayer, and some collections of puritan prayers, and those will help – but the most important part is simply to pray.

I was reminded recently that prayer is not the work of the Church, it is the very heart of the Church. Without prayer there is no connection with God, no seeking His face, no being led by His Spirit. Without prayer, all the labors of the Church are in vain. So let us then ask the Lord to teach us to pray; and may we know the great power of prayer as it is working (James 5:16).

I’ve added here some of the bullet points from the opening chapter of D.A. Carsons, A Call to Spiritual Reformation: Prioritiees from Paul and His Prayers (Baker Books, 1992, Grand Rapids, MI) Digital Copy.

  1. Much praying is not done because we do not plan to pray. We do not drift into spiritual life; we do not drift into disciplined prayer. we will not grow in prayer unless we plan to pray.
  2. Adopt practical ways to impede mental drift. Vocalize your prayers, pray over the scriptures, make prayer lists, journal your prayers – find ways to keep your mind focused on the act of prayer.
  3. At varies periods in your life, develop, if possible, a prayer partnership. Seek someone to teach you to pray, or someone you can teach. Prayer-partner relationships are as valuable for the discipline, accountability and regularity they engender as for the lessons that are shared.
  4. Choose models – but choose them well. Listen to others pray. Read books of prayer. Study their content, their breadth, their passion, their unction – but do not ape their idiom.
  5. Develop a system for prayer lists. Whatever the system, use prayer lists.
  6. Mingle praise, confession, and intercession; but when you intercede, try to tie as many request as possible to Scripture. One of the most important elements in intercession is to think through, in the light of Scripture, what it is God wants us to ask for.
  7. If you are in any form of spiritual leadership, work at your public prayers. Public prayer ought to be the overflow of one’s private praying.
  8. Pray until you pray. Pray long enough and honestly enough that you get past the feeling of formalism and unreality that attend not a little praying.

Readings from the Pastor’s Desk

Today, rather than my usual blog, I thought I’d share links to the things I’ve been reading (or viewing) today. Some are deeply theological or biblical, while others are just food for thought.  I pray you will be encouraged and blessed as I was.

  • Expiation and Propitiation
    I have to admit, I often don’t do a very good job of keeping these clearly defined. L. Michael Morales does a great job in TableTalk this month in defining the two terms, and showing how both are tied up in the work of the cross. “A Christian basks securely in the warm rays of the Father’s favor only because that storm of judgement has already broken in the full measure of its fury on the crucified Son of God. His shed blood cleanses us from our sins, removing our guilt from the sight of God.”
  • On the Immutability of God
    In preparation for tonight’s Middle School study on “God Never Changes” I came across this site from Precept Austin, which has a lot of great quotes on the immutability (unchangeability) of God. I’ve posted several readings from Tozer and Pink here before, and both are found in this article.  My favorite has to be A.W. Pink’s, “God cannot change for the better, for He is perfect; and being perfect, He cannot change for the worse.”
  • A Little Biblical Archaeology
    I had a class on Biblical History and Archaeology in college, taught by a former archaeologist from Jerusalem who actually passed around ancient oil lamps and coins dating back to the time of Abraham. Since then, I have always been interested in the finds of archaeology that are tied to Biblical history.  Here’s a short video about some recent important finds in Jerusalem.
  • Listen to the Bible
    Someone was sharing this week how they were listening to the Bible on CD in their car. Any opportunity we can get to be in the Word of God is a good thing.  If you’re looking for a way to hear the ESV Online, this link is for you.  If you want to hear what the Greek sounds like, click here.  When I read Greek, it sounds like Spanish, so please don’t ask me to read it out loud.
  • What did Shakespeare Sound Like?
    This has nothing to do with my studies, but it sure was fun to watch!

Enjoy!